Nick Kroll leads ‘League’ in laughs

Nia Pellone/Staff Photographer Comedy Central’s Nick Kroll performs in the Anderson Center’s Osterhout Theater on Sunday night.

He may not be known best for his stand-up, but Comedy Central’s Nick Kroll can certainly keep an audience laughing.

Last night’s performance, “Nick Kroll and the Comedy Central College Tour,” was held in the Anderson Center’s Osterhout Theater.

Cornell said the SA chose Kroll because he was going to be in the area and because of his high rankings on the Student Association Programming Board surveys.

Prior to the night of the show, ticket sales were at 254, but the show ended up generating 732 sold tickets.

Past comedic acts have included Aziz Ansari — a stand-up comedian known for his role on NBC’s “Parks and Recreation” — and Jon Stewart, of “The Daily Show.” However, unlike this year’s event, Stewart performed in the Events Center and Ansari performed in the West Gym.

“I like that we’re having it in the Anderson Center this year,” Cornell said. “It’s a much more intimate space and it’s how comedy is supposed to be heard — in an intimate theater, not in a cramped gym on bleachers.”

Comedian Joe Mande opened the show, and said he enjoyed being on tour with someone like Kroll.

“It’s good to do stand-up and open for someone like Nick because people actually come, unlike when I do stand-up on my own,” Mande said.

Mande covered a wide range of topics, from his ultimate sexual fantasy, to his experiences as a 10-year-old at sleep-away camp, to politics.

“I feel like Barack Obama is very sad lately because every time he looks in the mirror, no matter what he does, he knows Will Smith will play him in a movie some day,” he said.

Kroll started his act off by complementing the audience.

“You’re a good-looking crowd,” he said. “Any ‘basically single’ ladies out here? I’m recently single.”

He added that his friends have been giving him some terrible dating advice recently.

“My friends told me to go on a coffee date, but I don’t think my best foot forward is jittery with diarrhea,” Kroll said.

Throughout the show, he kept bringing up that he was single, even using a few pick-up lines on women in the audience.

“Excuse me, are you 9/11? Because like, I could never forget you,” he said.

Stand-up became a part of Kroll’s life during his college years at Georgetown University, where he graduated in 2001.

Kroll had Tully’s for dinner and said that he’s happy he finally got to try “the best chicken tenders in the world.”

“You know, instead of advertising them as ‘the best chicken tenders in the world, they should just say that they won’t make you squirt diarrhea for the rest of the night,” Kroll said.

Prior to the show, Cornell said she was looking forward to Kroll’s bit on the campus publications because she knew he had read some of them.

“He spent a lot of time reading Pipe Dream and Binghamton Review, so he’ll definitely be taking some jabs at our publications, which should be interesting,” she said.

Kroll weighed in on the unfolding Greek Life investigation on campus.

“If you could be a little bit fucked up, but I mean, not enough to shut the entire Greek Life system down, but enough to be like, ‘They’re showing ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ we should go,’” Kroll said. “I mean, what’s even going on here with Greek Life?”

Later, he addressed the Greek Life topic again, assuring students that everything will be OK.

“Don’t worry about the frats and sororities,” he said. “There will always be houses where bad booze can be served and where you can get date raped.”

At the end of his show, Kroll opened up an informal question-and-answer session.

One student asked when his new show, “The Kroll Show,” would be premiering. Kroll said the show is expected to start in the fall.

“It’s going to be really fun,” he said. “We wanted it to be ‘The Krollsby Show’ and then we thought of ‘Krollin’ Around With Nick Clown,’ but that one didn’t quite make it,” Kroll said.

Season 4 of “The League,” Kroll’s claim to fame, has yet to be filmed, but he said it’s fair to assume that some “very funny, horrible things” will air.

Brad Levine, a graduate student in accounting, said he was pleased with Kroll’s comedy routine, as it was similar to Kroll’s character Ruxin.

“He was really funny and pretty much exactly what I expected based on his character in ‘The League,’” Levine said.

Like Cornell, other students enjoyed his BU-related jokes.

“Both guys were very funny and I especially liked how Kroll incorporated jokes about Binghamton University into his routine,” said Andrew Dobry, a senior majoring in accounting.